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England

#RouteSelfie campaign

  • Posted on: 12 June 2015
  • By: Megalithic Routes

At the occasion of the Summer Seminar of the Cultural Routes which took place from 1st to 5th June 2015 in Osnabrück, Germany, the European Institute of Cultural Routes presented its new communication campaign on social networks (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest): #RouteSelfie.
The Institute, through the Hector Project, brings out a new action in order to improve the promotion of European Cultural Heritage among the general public. After Crossing Routes and its bloggers’ network in 2014, the Institute would like to offer a new communication tool to the Cultural routes by using social Media. This new communication campaign, “#RouteSelfie”, will last from June to 1st September 2015 and will be officially launch on Wednesday 10th June 2015.
The campaign’s principle is to invite travellers, tourists, bloggers, to discover Cultural Routes of the Council of Europe and to share their touristic and cultural experience through Selfies posted on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or Pinterest. All publications related to the campaign on social Media will be identifying by the hashtag #RouteSelfie.

The aims of the campaign are numerous:
• Identify the public and attract more visitors and different targets on Council of Europe Cultural Routes;
• Promote European Heritages especially those includes in Cultural Routes;
• Improve communication with general public about activities developed by Cultural Routes Networks;
• Create a community of travellers and visitors from the whole world who could share impressions, discoveries and experiences about European Cultural Routes;
• Bring European Citizens together around their common Heritage.
 

The European Day of Megalithic Culture

30 April 2017 marks the 4th European Day of Megalithic Culture. Highlight of the Megalithic Routes Association, our members show off their megaliths in different regions in Europe. We celebrate Megalithic cultures in many aspects. This year, the theme is “moving stones”. We still do not know how Stone Age people moved the large boulders which were deposited here by the Ice Age glaciers about 200,000 years ago. If it were not the Old Huns or the Devil, how did people back in the past really move these stones?

Long barrows and stone circles in southern England

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Megalithic monuments in Britain are mainly concentrated in western and northern areas where sources of suitable stone were widely available. In the south and east of the country comparable monuments were mainly built of wood. Many different styles exist, some reflecting local traditions while others illustrate changing preferences over time. Strong connections can be seen in the design of the monuments with structures south-westwards along the Atlantic seaways in Ireland, France, Spain, and Portugal, and eastwards towards southern Scandinavia, northern Germany, and the Netherlands.