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Danmarks Megalitcenter

Contact: 

Foreningen Danmarks Megalitcenter
Jægervænget 1, Orslev
DK-4760 Vordingborg       
Denmark

Phone: +45 20139040
E-mail: asger@4760.dk

Denmark does not have a center presenting and providing information about the many megaliths found in the country. Denmark has a central place with respect to the construction of these types of stone graves. They are common in most of Denmark, with the exception of Western Jutland.

On Southern Zealand and the island of Møn there is especially many megaliths of three different types: barrows, passage graves and dolmens. Therefore, we consider that a Danish Center for the presentation and explanation of the presence of these stone graves should lie in the municipality of Vordingborg. Denmarks Megalithic Center will present information about the first Neolithic agricultural society in Denmark and its relationship to the other northern European prehistoric cultures including cultural development in remainder of the world. 

We are a little local group that is lucky to live in the middle of a municipality that has over 600 visible megaliths of the ca. 2200 extant in entire Denmark. In fact, our village has 10 within its boundaries of which 2 are among the oldest. The village, Ørslev, is centrally placed, only 5-10 min to the highway to continental Europe in one direction and to Scandinavia as a whole in the other. The aim of our group is to establish a Megalith Center in the middle of Vordingborg in our village, in order to present information about the first Neolithic agricultural society in Denmark (Funnel Beaker Society) and its relationship to the other northern European prehistoric cultures, including cultural development in the remainder of the world. Over a short period of time (3900-3500 BC), these first agricultural societies carried out an extensive production of the stone buildings we now know as Megaliths – the so-called barrows, passage graves and dolmans, in connection with their burial rituals.
As yet we are small but have support from the general population. Most Danes are vaguely aware of the megaliths in their midst but take them for granted and do not really know how and why they came to be there. Awareness of an important part of Danish and world history – the Neolithic, is just as necessary as learning the more recent parts of history.

Tags: 
People Behind: 

Asger Diness Andersen
Phone: +45 20139040
E-mail: asger@4760.dk